2011-08-12

Party time! Backup time!

Tonight Ewelina, Már, Kristína and myself are going out to eat fancy food on PageKite's dime. But I think I'll blog about that on the company blog, not here.

In other news, last night I spent some time working on the computers at home; I reconfigured Ewelina's laptop to be the master of our photo album (instead of my laptop). So now she can spend all her waking non-working hours sorting and tagging the hundreds of photos we've taken since returning from South America...

Feeling good about that, I proceeded to work on improving our home backup system. Our home backups are a little bit crazy - we have an extremely schizofrenic machine in the corner of our living room which runs both Windows and about 10 Linux virtual machines at once (using VMWare Player). The Windows host is responsible for games and movies and other entertainment, most of the Linux VMs are PageKite development infrastructure. One however, is for personal use: our home backup server, Vinky.

Vinky has direct access to the local disks, with 2 roughly 1TB partitions on separate disks dedicated to backups. Until last night I had really only been making use of one of them, using my Dirvish/rsync backup system to automatically back up our laptops and my in-the-cloud virtual server (ohno.klaki.net).

The other drive was just sort of sitting there, waiting for me to figure out how to best make use of it. Inspired by my sysadmin work for Opin Kerfi of late, last night I decided to reconfigure the system to use RAID-1 mirroring over both 1TB partitions. This means even if one of the disks malfunctions, our backups should survive. Then I fixed the problems that were preventing it from making backups of my home directory on Klaki... so now the only major omissions are our photo album (the original raw files are not automatically backed up yet, the working copy JPEGs are) and my pre-Ireland data, which I seem to have misplaced...

This is getting very close to being a enterprise-grade backup system: the system is fully automated, it tolerates hardware failure and it protects against human error by storing multiple snapshots of all data - all that's really missing is a regime of regularly swapping out one of the drives and storing it to an off-site lockbox. Considering that a lot of the original data is already either mobile or off-site, I'm not even sure that is really justified.

I am such a geek...

Tags: life, tech


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